CORRECTIVE JAW SURGERY

The goal of corrective jaw surgery is to establish a stable, functional balance of the teeth, jaws, and surrounding facial structures.

In conjunction with orthodontic treatment, corrective jaw surgery is used to assist in the correction of crooked teeth and to enhance aesthetics.  Depending on the extent of the patient’s problem, corrective jaw surgery may range from minor movement  of a single part of a dental arch to repositioning an entire jaw or  repositioning both jaws and adjoining facial bones.

We provide a comprehensive program for treatment of patients with skeletal facial problems.  For instance, we make large jaws smaller and small jaws larger.  Procedures are done to correct gummy smiles or to shorten and lengthen faces.  Most dental facial deformities can be corrected.

Advances in surgery and anaesthesia have enabled patients to undergo these procedures safely with minimal discomfort and swelling and to achieve predictable results.

Surgical techniques allow almost all corrective jaw surgery procedures to be done from inside the mouth so no incision on the face are necessary.

Techniques have now been developed so most patients can have surgery with the upper teeth wired to the lower teeth.  New techniques and anaesthetics have led to shortened hospital stays and rapid recovery.  Patients obtain important functional and psychological benefits.

1. PROGNATHISM: Horizontal overgrowth in the upper or lower jaw.

2. MICROGENIA: A chin that is too small.  A small chin may occur as an isolated deformity or may accompany another abnormality such as a retrognathic mandible.

3. RETROGNATHISM:  A small jaw that does not match the opposing jaw.  Both upper and lower jaws can be affected.

4. OPEN BITE:  A deformity that occurs when the front upper teeth do not contact the front lower teeth.

5. VERTICAL FACIAL EXCESS:  A face that is too long.  This may be overgrowth of the mid-face alone or may appear in combination with other abnormalities.  Patients with this problem often complain of showing too much gum tissue when smiling and frequently demonstrate lip strain as they try to mask the abnormality by forcing their lips together over their front teeth.

6. VERTICAL FACIAL DEFICIENCY refers to the opposite of vertical facial excess.  With this problem the face is too short. 

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